eee gads

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Here’s the problem. I stay up late anyway, got age-related insomnia. I suspect.

But yesterday, was out and about, without access to my awesome well water and the city water was pukable. So, thinking I was wise in my own eyes, I made a gallon of tea and drank the whole thing. The entire morning, afternoon, and evening.

Yep.

Which meant a lot of er, interruptions. Add to that, multi-tasking at lightspeed, dancing to rap (which I highly dislike), then on social media, hush… while typing without looking at my computer, and wide, wide awake until 3:30 a.m.

Well, after all the fun below it was 4:30 a.m.

Thankfully, no sugar was added to this or things might have been much worse. Still, had upset tummy from this and after trying to get hubby to stop snoring and my tummy under control, headed for the way-too-short couch to sleep. Then comes hubby bright-eyed at 7 a.m.

“Whatcha doin’ out here?” or some such. I mumbled something and felt well enough to plant my face into bed. Needless to say I slept like the dead. Coming off a clearcut high and crashing.

wot?

I’ve never had illicit drugs (or legit drugs that do this) but wowsa if this is like what drug addicts go through, then my heart goes out to those jonesing. Kind of like what I am doing for just a hit of tea.

Should I find a twelve-step program? “Hi. My name is Claire and I am addicted to Lipton tea.” Would that fly?

Just curious.

So, when I did drag myself from the bed I ended up drinking 2 pots of coffee, not 2 cups.

That was a zone I have never experienced before, and will probably never do this ever, ever again. With the exception of finishing off that one… glass… of tea.

Avoiding the Edit (yeesh)

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OKAY YES. I am in denial, dodging the final edit of my WIP which is really the very, very last time to look at the MS having only 20 chapters left (out of 41).

Instead, I have been fiddling with social media. Browsing Amazon. For stuff I really don’t need. The whole time. Nevertheless, there on Amazon I fondle thoughts of the ‘yeah… that would come in handy. Should I pay a bill, first? Nah. Wait. Maybe.’

Yes, Sally. The whole time. I do my best (no, no, the worst) browsing for stuff on Amazon at night. As an insomniac, it is what I do, and thankfully, not for a living. Oh, if only. I have to admit that purchasing a Ron Popeil’s Ronco Rotisserie from some TV ad was the hands down best purchase I have ever made. I’ve had 3… one too small, the next my son accidentally broke, and the next, he bought and we share. Now twice as much $ as when we bought them.

yee haw!

Along with things like lights for when the electricity goes off and we’re left in the dark (TV ad). OH. And beeswax for candles which I hand-roll for Christmas presents Amazon). And some useful appliances, most of which are non-electric (for those times when there’s no electricity, I mean, coffee is essential to life! I have a wood stove so cooking is a cinch. BBQ in the summer). See? A few things come from there. Over the past 19 years <cough>.

Lest you think I am lazy at all things, I did read Judges, chapter 9 today, which is a cool read. So, lemme get to it.

Verse 2, I just want to point out archeology has found this site and identified as Israel’s land.

Next and unfortunately, after the death of Gideon, the leaders and the entire city fell back into complete, utter slavery to evil. Abimelech became arrogant, power-hungry, murdered all but one of his brothers, and destructive of the Jewish faith by worshiping idols (sounds familiar, like ‘the devil comes to kill, steal and destroy) and decided he’d take power from God as king for himself. He destroyed the fields by salting them so the faithful would have nothing.

He went onto campaigns of murder by going after the faithful, killing men and women warriors (like martyrs of Old and New testament and even today’s world). Those faithful who fled to a stronger tower (‘resist the devil and he will flee’). A woman pushed a large ROCK (Jesus?) onto Abimelech’s head (crushing it like in Genesis 3?)

The rest of the enemies were freaked out, understandably and fled where they were destroyed (hell?)

Anywho… that is my read for the day, praying that it is correct in the interpretation.

Now, I am off to exercise self-control over social media.

Numbers 30 (Torah), SHORT, I PROMISE!

Much shorter than yesterdays post on Numbers 29 but equally as important.

Numbers 30 talks about men and women taking vows (to the Lord i.e. I promise to fast 5 days, or whatever). Back then, it was a very patriarchal society, so men had a say if they weren’t amenable to such a vow. Anyone first off, that made a vow and didn’t uphold it was responsible for breaking it (they weren’t stoned, or anything), man or woman.

However, if the father or husband refused the wife to make a vow she desired, she was released from the vow and the husband or father was accountable.

How does this apply now? Jesus talked about vows and not to even make them, but rather say your yes be yes and your no be no.

What does that even mean? 1. vows are a works-oriented issue and 2. men were no longer part of this decision-making for daughters or wives. 3. We individually are responsible for not fulfilling that yes to our friend/God, and we are given praise if we give a no and then fulfill it anyway. 4. God is our Father and the church always represents the Bride of the Messiah (throughout the entire OT).

So Yeshua released everyone from the law. Through the Cross.

Torah-Scroll1

More Numbers :)

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As I continue my trek through the Book of Numbers in the Tenakh, I am on chapter 28. Fantastic chapter.

My theological opinions are of my own research, however, if I’m completely off-base,

I welcome correction.

This is yet another cool very cool chapter. Moses is about to die and the LORD tells

him this. Moses prays not for his own life now, but for a successor. With me so far?

Back in chapter 13, Moses sent spies to the New Land, and Caleb and Joshua came

back with good reports. So good, in fact, it sounds like heaven on earth. Caleb went

first, reported first (Caleb means faithful).

Now in Ch 28 Moses chose Joshua (In Hebrew, Yeshuah, in Greek, Jesus, means God
rescues) to lead His people. This is prophetic. John the Baptist was a typology of
Caleb, going before, making a way, giving a good report of the ultimate promised
land through Jesus (Joshua was not just wise and very brave, he was a typology of
the ultimate rescuer, Jesus) who was appointed leader of the people, of the armies
(people of God and angels).

Why I like Short Blogs

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Gotta say I have the attention span of waiting in line for a Big Mac. No. I do not eat at McDonald’s, ever. You get the drift.

But the thing is, count me guilty for long posts in the past, but perhaps only interviews with authors get more WP space. My inner thoughts are just not that lofty.

If I wax poetic on spiritual matters that too may garner more space especially when I post Scripture.

We all have a life, work, other social media, and heaven forbid I eat into your time.

Very few sites suck me into a long post as well. Guilty of passing by others, and many apologies when I do, but three, four, and five pages I may skip or skim.

Forgive me. But this is all ya get. Today. Gotta run. Got stuff I must do, and spending too much time posting &/or reading is not scheduled.  😉

terminator I ll be back

‘Warrior’

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Warrior

Once again, Linda Rodante hits it out of the park. ‘Warrior’ is her latest in Christian romance and suspense, but let me take a moment to pause.

dramatic pause prince.gif

Okay, pause complete.

Linda writes compelling stories that resonate in individuals, truly, no matter their background, the struggles of everyone, meeting God’s redemption. His grace. How individual characters fit into the story as part of the Grand Tapestry by the Master Weaver.

‘Warrior’ is a bit different, yes there is romance and suspense, but the story revolves around three people: Josh, an assistant pastor with a vision, Reese, Josh’s best friend and once bad boy, and Kati, a fervent believer hiding her own past and training hard for confidence–using the vehicle of kickboxing.

kickboxing woman

When the challenge is given, Josh prays. It’s time. ‘Go big or go home,’ is a tame version of how God wants to work in this story. He calls upon Josh and the congregation to be radical, dangerous, fearless. This is not a story about bad guys/good guys, this is a story about war. Spiritual warfare that doesn’t include the flying, flashing angels and demons. The kind of war you and I don’t want to talk about. Breaking chains.

Do Christians listen to a sermon, happy, maybe rushing to go home to ‘get on with their lives?’ Yes, we do, in fact we become so cushy comfortable that our lassitude is really apathy and what is more sad than our lukewarm, milk toast attitude? That comfort is not a win for us, it’s a win for the Enemy.

But for those who fight, it’s a glorious battle. But not everyone survives the skirmish, the battle for those who fight the good fight.

Linda wrote this book, coming out of her own comfort zone to uplift, encourage and inspire those who know of the battle that wages around us. Honestly this could be recommended reading for those interested in spiritual warfare (and required reading for seminaries).

Excellent read.

 

Dale Amidei’s – ‘A Garden in Russia’

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a garden in russia

I swear, Dale Amidei is/was an assassin. Perhaps, married to one. Ahem. His knowledge and research are frighteningly real, vast, and varied. Dale, does the CIA know about you? Are you like, a consultant to the intelligence community?

Okay, besides that… I just read ‘A Garden in Russia,’ his fifth in the Boone File series. Dale is adept at writing strong female characters, tough guys, nurturing men and women, and villains in the end, who have far more to do with what is the lethality of politics and intrigue than a shadowy character with a knife and evil intent.

I’ve read all of the Boone Files, and this does not disappoint. After #4, while I awaited #5, I started at the beginning, ‘The Anvil of the Craftsman,’ which I pressed here previously. A writer, reader of well, any genre can see the ability of Dale Amidei’s writing as complex, intriguing and well-crafted. I honestly hold my breath often, wondering who is going to be shot? What will happen here?

The powers and money behind what happens in the U.S. affects what happens in Russia as well. Like I said, more real than not. Read the paper, watch the news, then you tell me, how did he nail those details so well? Dale’s writing? Never a disappointment.

Something I could imagine seeing in Boone’s bathroom

bathroom pic

Okay, so that’s my bathroom. Romantic comedy, right?

‘Pursuit’ by Indy Quillen

I am relatively new to Indy’s writing, I confess. However, having read the first two in her Fox Walker series, I’d say I’m hooked.

I’ve read ‘Tracker,’ and last night finished ‘Pursuit.’

pursuit indy quillen

I would have to say, she has done her research, and it shows. Not simply in crime and investigation,  the FBI, local police, retired profilers (which is daunting in itself), but again in her research of First Nations ways.

I suspect she has put all of these tracking, hunting, cooking culture into practice. Bow hunting. Walking from toe-to-heel (that one from ‘Tracker’). Cooking with mud. Who knew? I stopped to take notes… And much, much more.

‘Pursuit’ is a gripping tale of Walker tracking a murderer who has deadly skills. His question is, why did the FBI not send their own? Fox, armed only with a knife and sharp skills finds more truth than he was prepared for.

Great writing. Next book is on my list!

 

6 in the Styx – Brad Carl

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This writer is insane. I MEAN, imaginative and a bit um, yes, disturbed. But a man of many talents, he can write full-length novels, non-fiction and short stories.

So I hate him, I mean love his writing. 6 in the Styx is six (hence the title) short stories that are fun to read. I was up to the wee hours finishing the stories, thinking, oh this guy is so screwed (the character, mind you) to laughing too loud.

laughing spit out coffee

*Unappreciative husband told me to use my inside voice. Pfft.*

Anywho, 6 in the Styx is now available on Amazon for $2.99. Cheaper than answering a stranger’s cellphone in an airport. Yes, there is something wrong about doing so, and Brad will tell you all about it.

Don’t miss it, even if you are a full-length novel reader only. You’ll be entertained, disturbed (he is weird did I mention that?) and in stitches laughing.

 

6 In The Styx - Brad Carl

Brad. He needs prayer… I mean, a long life to write more.

Brad Carl

 

Reading Boone

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via Reading Boone  

Dale Amidei: Leading into next month’s release of Boone’s fifth and epic title, A Garden in Russia, I have the opportunity to hand off the forum to a pair of her biggest fans, Rebecca Johnson and Claire O’Sullivan. Ladies, the floor is yours:

Rebecca: Firstly, thank you, Dale, for allowing us to guest post on your page. Claire O’Sullivan and I are here to nag Dale Amidei about his newest book discuss Dale Amidei’s first female heroine in his Boone series of espionage thrillers, a sort of international/ political Tales from the Dark Side. Dale writes complex, powerful novels that pull his characters into unthinkable situations, which is why I have temporarily given up paranormal fiction in favor of devouring his books.

Claire: Readers and writers alike, no matter their preferred genre, would find Dale’s geopolitical intrigue novels exemplary.

Rebecca: That’s some mighty highfalutin language there, but I think you’re absolutely right.

Claire: All I’m saying is that, as primarily a romance reader, I find his books a delicious departure from my usual reads, just like you do.

Rebecca: Can’t argue with you there … but about Boone: How do you relate to her character?

Claire: I think she’s a bad-arse, and I mean that in the “holy-crap-if-she-was-real” sense (and maybe she is). I wouldn’t want to get on her bad side. Respect her, yes. Mess with her, no way. I would actually like to be Boone. What about you? How do you see her?

Rebecca: Well, you know, every woman has those days when everything jells, right? The makeup and hair work, the clothes fit perfectly, the job rolls on smooth wheels. Then there’s the rest of the time, when the mirror and the closet are your enemies, and the job develops a square wheel and just clunks along, and the kids track dog poop all through the house ten minutes before the party. Those kinds of issues are hiccups in the greater scheme of things, I know, but they seem like disasters at the time. 

And then there’s Dr. Rebecca Boone Hildebrandt’s world. She’s an intel operative who deals in—how to say it?—correcting political situations detrimental to independence and freedom. She takes on the jobs no one in the real world wants to think about. Her profession involves stealth, constant situational awareness, and occasionally sudden death: both other people’s and possibly her own. She has to be good at what she does, just to survive. Dog poop on the floor is the least of her worries.  And yet, even with her youth and strength, she is full of flaws and desires. She has the same soul shadows and asks the same questions we all do: “What have I become? Did I ever have a choice?”

Claire:  I’ve read all four of Dale’s Boone’s File novels, and I’m waiting for the fifth one, A Garden in Russia. Taken together, they chronicle Boone’s journey from a flawed, confused enforcer of justice to a clear-headed confident woman who manages to reconcile her profession with her soul. She’s a cool, aloof bad-girl trigger mama in the first book, truly someone you’d not want to disrespect. But she changes as each novel unravels another of her protective layers, and she begins to thaw into something more human and fragile.

Rebecca: Exactly! And I think the title of the first Boone book, Absinthe and Chocolate, describes her perfectly. Chocolate represents everything Boone is: rich, lush, exquisite, and extreme.  Absinthe, nicknamed the “Green Fairy,” symbolized a changing social order in 19th-century Paris, a new generation of free thinkers and transformative ideas. The Green Fairy was also the embodiment of rebellion, especially female rebellion. Boone is nothing if not transformative and rebellious.

Claire: Well, you’re just chock full of weird information. But why am I not surprised? Dale’s first book hooked me into the series. It really showed Boone’s skills as well as her flaws. But in the second book, The Bonus Pool, Boone learns from a persecuted Chinese Christian pastor how to find peace in her life, and that we all “go from darkness into the Light.” Dale is a master at crafting Boone’s reflections on the old man’s words, as she moves from her internal conflict toward peace.

That starts the ball rolling for Boone. By the end of the third and fourth books (One Last Scent of Jasmine and Meat for the Lion), she’s moved away from her despair and doubt, and into a more clear-headed sense of her purpose in life.

Rebecca: Seeing her transformation made me want to say, “Maybe I can do that, too. In my own way I can be better, if I remember that every move is always from the darkness toward the Light.” In these days of turmoil both here and abroad, that’s a good way to think, not only for Boone but for the rest of us who are still cleaning up the dog poop.

Claire: But regarding the writing—you know, Dale writes so well that there are days I wonder why I even bother. And did you ever ask yourself, how does he know so much?

Rebecca: After reading his novels with all those Special Ops and gun-related details, do you really want to ask that question?

Claire: Well, maybe no. But I do enjoy his books, because they’re not just complex in terms of characters and storylines. They address the human condition, whether it’s Boone or another character discoursing on current global and political issues. And in Boone’s case, he manages to hold up a mirror to her soul, so that she—and we—can see her heart laid bare.

For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known.’
-Paul of Tarsus (or 1 Corinthians 13:12)

I feel like I know her better now.

Rebecca: Well enough to mess with her?

Claire: You think you’re so funny. .. 

Rebecca Johnson was born and raised in the southern United States, mostly in North Carolina with brief relocations to South Carolina and Virginia. She is by education a medical technologist, graduating with honors from N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hill, and by preference a calligrapher, needlework designer, and graphic artist. She writes paranormal romances by night when no one is watching, and hides her manuscripts under quilting and needlepoint projects during the day. In her spare time she beta-reads for other writers, searching for nitpicking errors. She believes that God’s purpose for her life is to cause as much trouble for as many people as she possibly can, and she spends at least part of each day fulfilling that purpose. 

Claire O’Sullivan was raised in corn and cow country in the Midwest where she learned the nuances of ‘moo’ to PhD level (piled higher and deeper). She attended the University of Wisconsin at River Falls (aka Moo U) with a major in psychology, and changed minors every other week. She left Moo U and attended Lutheran Bible Institute and obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Biblical studies. She has fiddled with writing forever, and currently has several crime/romances in the works, including a comedy noir. She’s pretty sure that Rebecca is indeed fulfilling her purpose by tormenting her daily… er, helping Claire endeavor to write.

Thank you, ladies. I couldn’t have said it better myself.

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